Welcome!

From the CEO of CollabNet

Flint Brenton

Subscribe to Flint Brenton: eMailAlertsEmail Alerts
Get Flint Brenton via: homepageHomepage mobileMobile rssRSS facebookFacebook twitterTwitter linkedinLinkedIn


Related Topics: Cloud Computing, Agile Software Development

Article

So You Want to Centralize? | @CloudExpo #Cloud #IoT #Microservices

Centralization is an ever-evolving process that helps your organization react quickly & make smarter organization decisions

So you want to centralize your enterprise? Smart choice - but it's important to take some factors into consideration if you want to have success. Developers need to ensure representation from each geographic location; understand current development processes and tools; and comprehend the biggest challenges. Furthermore, you need to be aware of, and sensitive to, your project teams' preferences for existing tools and aversion to change.

Before we get started into our list of the "7 Steps to Start Centralization," let's tackle the question you are probably asking - "What is centralization, anyway?"

Centralization is really an ever-evolving process that helps your organization react quickly, make smarter organization decisions, and - yes - be more agile. Centralization means breaking down organizational silos, encourages collaboration, and allows stakeholders the ability to make effective and efficient decisions, from top to the bottom.

So let's dive in:

Step 1: Create a Task Force
Because centralization is not necessarily easy, it's helpful to create a task force to stay focused and organized. This task force should be responsible for

  • knowing the corporate culture, asking questions like, "Are there specific teams or geographical locations that might be resistant to change?"
  • determining if there are tools and/or data that cannot be easily centralized.
  • doing most of the heavy lifting for the remaining six steps.

Choose members who are organized, know your organization inside and out, are impartial, and adept at thinking outside the box.

Step 2: Establish a High-Level Plan
Before you get down to the nitty-gritty details of centralization, take a 10,000 foot view of the project and develop a high-level plan. Decide whether to develop or purchase the platform you want to use. This might seem obvious, but it's very easy to get caught up in the details without making the decision. Identify the tools that your organization absolutely needs and make sure they are going to be integrated into your central platform.  If you're building your own platform, this will help you build those functionalities into it. On the other hand, if you are buying the platform you are going to use, you can make sure the platform has the tools you absolutely need. There is nothing worse than researching and buying a platform and then discovering it is missing one of the tools you need to be successful. By mapping out your high-level plan, you can avoid running into that sort of issue.

Step 3: Choose Tools for Centralization
Now that you have your high-level plan and an idea of the essential functions of the tools you will be using, you can actually go about the business of choosing the specific tools you need to accomplish centralization. Use an existing team, or even a new one, that is a fair representation of the teams throughout your organization as a case study to choose what will work best for everyone involved.

Step 4: Identify Potential Risks
The best way to avoid potential stumbling blocks is to see them coming. Sit down and try your best to identify potential pitfalls. By having a solid understanding of where difficulties might be hiding, you will be that much better at tackling them if they do, in fact, become issues.

Besides identifying the risks, also come up with a best plan of action for mitigating them and also establish a timeline for conversion. After an initial pilot project, you can go back and refine your timelines once you have a better understanding of how long they will really take - allowing you to better measure successes. One area to take note of is an individual's aversion to change. When people have been doing the same thing for a long time, they might not take kindly to change.  Be understanding and sensitive to this issue, while also building a plan to bring everyone on board with comfort and ease.

Step 5: Conduct Pilot
You are now ready for a test run! Start new projects using your new tools and systems and see how things go. Make sure to play close attention to bottlenecks and issues in your progress - this is your best chance to work out any potential issues with your centralization process. Measure successes as well as failures so you know what is going right and where you can still improve.

Step 6: Devise the Rollout Plan
You've got the tools, your metrics for success, and everyone in your organization on board - how do you actually put the plan into place? This is the step for you to decide the best way to approach rolling out your new plan. Provide a central team to help with onboarding - if people in your organization have questions, it can make the transition much easier if they know who to turn to.  This team can also help troubleshoot your roll-out process. By measuring success regularly, they can identify any issues as they pop up, and fix them before they become real headaches!

Step 7: Implementation
With a plan in your back pocket, the tools you need at your disposal, a solid idea of potential roadblocks (and a strategy of how to deal with them), the buy-in of your organization and a strong idea of what success looks like, you are ready to move forward with the implementation of your plan. Again, having a central team to help your organization deal with the transition is key and be sure to measure your success on a consistent basis, not only to identify problems as they arise, but to also fine-tune your strategy to have your organization running at peak efficiency in no time.

Conclusion
It is important to remember that while one of the goals of centralization is to break down organization silos within your company that cause issues in your development process, it is important for the centralization process to take into consideration the various needs of different groups within your company. Failure to do so can isolate groups and actually reinforce the silos that already exist.

But by taking into account all the groups in your organization and their processes and needs, you can have an organization that moves as one, making it more efficient and effective.

As you develop your plan for centralization, the biggest thing we can stress is to focus on staying organized and doing your homework in advance. With a clear plan in place and an understanding of potential issues you might encounter, your path to having a centralized organization will be smooth sailing.

 

More Stories By Flint Brenton

Mr. Flint Brenton has extensive experience building successful software companies, with a proven track record of accelerating growth through innovation and sales execution. He is currently CEO of CollabNet, a Vector Capital-owned leader in open Application Lifecycle Management (ALM). He also serves as an operating partner at Vector, advancing its position as a transformational partner to technology businesses. Mr. Brenton is a member of the Software & Services Division (SSD), and is on the board of directors for the Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA). Previously, Mr. Brenton served as president and CEO of AccelOps, a provider of IT operations analytics for cloud and virtualized infrastructures. Prior to that, he served as president and CEO of Tidal Software, a leader in application automation software. At both AccelOps and Tidal Software, Mr. Brenton more than tripled sales under his leadership while focusing both companies on disruptive product introductions. Tidal Software was later acquired by Cisco and Mr. Brenton served in follow-on capacities there, including vice president of advanced services, and senior vice president of engineering for Cisco's cloud-based Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Platform as a Service (PaaS) offerings. He also has held leadership positions at NetIQ, Compaq Computer Corporation, BMC Software and IBM. He received a master's in business and public management from Rice University and a Bachelor of Science degree from Mount Union College.